Here's our latest sexual predator


#1

Early yesterday evening, a story broke on Bloomberg alleging Uber investor and Hyperloop One co-founder Shervin Pishevar had used his position of power to make unwanted sexual advances to at least five women. Pishevar, through his lawyer, now says these allegations are part of a “smear campaign” against him.

Poor baby :cry:

https://www.yahoo.com/tech/shervin-pishevar-responds-allegations-sexual-192044458.html


#2

It bothers no one that the actions toward a woman by two men might be the same yet one gets the goods while the other gets a letter from an attorney.


#3

Huh???


#4

I would be afraid in today’s climate to express my interest to a woman. If it is “unwelcomed” one might expect a police action.

Oh where have impromptu romantic flourishes and spontaneous passion been banished to?


#5

I think some men just need to learn how to communicate properly, and stop thinking predation is in any way sexy. It would save everyone a lot of confusion. And perhaps they should just refrain from even thinking about dating subordinates. That way, we’d have lots more women in power positions! Two birds…


#6

on top?


#7

If man A flirts and is rebuffed, he should stop.
If man B flirts with the same woman and is accepted, hey, it’s not fair, right? Man A should have the same access rights, right?


#8

When I played music women would walk up to me and grab my junk… on a regular basis. The bass player used to stand on the edge of the stage and women would come up and put their face in his crotch, sometimes they’d stay there while he sang an entire song. There were so many of these predatory women I can’t even begin to remember them all, usually riled up on booze and out with their girlfriends while their boyfriends and husbands were at home. Permanently scarred by it all and now I have to smoke a bunch of weed to deal with the PTSD.


#9

Yes. What I am saying is that the reaction to identical actions in expressing interest, in today’s climate, a rebuff might be a legal action rather than a simple no thanks.

Ahhh, one remembers the days when ones eyes would meet those of a beautiful woman, or a useful one anyway, penetrating them deeply, drawing her close from the waist, lips pressing firmly, warmly, we kiss. Then a question - “What’s your name?”.


#10

GOD DAMN IT! There’s that misuse of word again.


#11

If ya don’t say no, and allow it to continue, seems to me that ain’t harassment

(now, you said “predatory”, and that I can’t disagree with)


#12

Jesus, dude - he was traumatized into a life of substance abuse and message board ownership on account of their sexual aggression. Have you no compassion?


#13

'splain, please.


#14

No 'splaination required, mang.


#15

That can be called by one word: paranoia.


#16

This is evidence to me that you have no frickin idea how much utter crap women have had to put up with. Most women can tell the difference between flirtation and harassment. But apparently some men just can’t.


#17

Reactionaryism. Once a climate of hyper sensitivity is engendered, natural interaction is buried by mudslide.


#18

Thou dost protest too much. Sorry.

Women enjoy flirtation with people they are attracted to. Men need to learn to just STOP when it’s clear a woman has no interest in them.


#19

I agree with that. What I am saying is that I have seen wild and unwarranted reactions to innocent approaches. What I see as possible in light of today’s news and emboldening of women to make legal complaints that a harsh rebuke may be replaced by court case.
and…
That men will be reluctant to chance a charming encounter.
No one should seek to justify “mashing” or molestation, but squashing natural pursuit isn’t healthy either.

Fortunately for me, I’ve never had to chance an aggressive hunt, needing only to let the quarry be drawn in by will.


#20

Is this the part where your mom comes in and wakes you up, while you’re crying and in a cold sweat?